Tommy Keene – Excitement At Your Feet (2013)

TOTommy Keene delved deep into his record collection for Excitement at Your Feet ( Second Motion Records), his 10th studio effort and first LP of cover songs, due for release Sept. 17. Those who have followed Tommy’s career know his definitive versions of Alex Chilton’s “Hey Little Child” and Lou Reed’s “Kill Your Sons.” Here he covers iconic artists such as  the Rolling Stones, the Who, the Bee Gees — but apart from Donovan’s “Catch the Wind,” none of Excitement’s 11 tracks ever troubled the U.S. singles chart.
Instead, Excitement is largely about the artist’s personal musical inspiration. Tommy pays tribute to his aforementioned British Invasion heroes, but also his East Coast punk/new wave roots with covers of Television and Mink Deville. On a more contemporary note, he also tips his hat to Keene Brothers partner Robert Pollard with a cover of Guided By Voices’ “Choking Tara.” Other gems include Echo & the Bunnymen’s “The Puppet” and Roxy Music’s “Out of the Blue.”

mp3 320 kbps | 81 MB | UL | CL

Bob Neuwirth – Havana Midnight (2001)

BOBBob Neuwirth is known inside the music business as Bob Dylan’s associate during the mid-’60s and early ’70s. He eventually began to record his own music in the early ’70s, and while he has only recorded sporadically, critics have frequently sung his praises. Recorded in 1999 in Cuba, Havana Midnight beautifully documents the collaboration between Neuwirth and composer/arranger/pianist José Maria Vitier. The album’s spare, atmospheric sound immediately draws the listener’s attention on the title cut. Reminiscent of Terry Allen at his most mellow, an evocative combination of bongos, piano, and tabla lays down the ideal base for Neuwirth’s relaxed vocals. Both “The First Time” and “Dead Man’s Clothes” follow the opening cut in a calm, peaceful procession that quietly introduces themes of desire, lost dreams, and regret. As a whole, Havana Midnight unfolds like a soul’s journey in a strange land, both dark and beautiful. Lyrically, “Don Quixote” and “The Call” run deeper than the typical singer/songwriter fare, as if painted on a timeless canvas. The overall approach, musically, vocally, and lyrically, is low-key, as though a poet were whispering a desperate story to himself or herself late at night. The arrangements are an epitome of taste, and include such subtle touches as rain in the background at the beginning of “Havana Farewell.” Pianist Vitier and guitarist Rey Guerra add lovely fills to a number of cuts, deftly enhancing these proceedings. If fortune shines on the dark world of Bob Neuwirth, this recording will spread his good name and inspire listeners to seek out his older material.

mp3 320 kbps | 123 MB | UL | CL

The Rich Hands – Dreamers (2013)

rThe Rich Hands, the three-piece garage rock ‘n’ rollers from San Antonio, Texas, have released their excellent album ‘Dreamers’.
The boys, who formed back in 2011, have already put out an EP and two singles, but this last month has finally seen the release of their debut album. Full of straight up rock and roll, melodies and catchy chorus’; the album has been released on cassette on Burger Records and on LP by Fountain Records.

mp3 128 kbps | 42 MB | UL | CL

Pavlov’s Dog – Pampered Menial (1975) [Original recording remastered – 2013]

paEsoteric Recordings are pleased to announce a newly remastered edition of the classic 1975 debut album by American Progressive Rock group Pavlov’s Dog. Formed in St. Louis in 1972, Pavlov’s Dog released this classic album in 1975 with a line-up of David Surkamp (Vocals, Guitar), David Hamilton (Keyboards), Doug Rayburn (Mellotron, Flute), Mike Safron (Drums, Percussion), Rick Stockton (Bass), Seigfried Carver (Violin, Vitar, Viola) and Steve Scorfina (Lead Guitar). A classic of the Progressive Rock genre, “Pampered Menial” has been newly remastered and the booklet fully restores the original album artwork and includes a new essay.

mp3 320 kbps | 86 MB | UL | CL        FLAC + Covers | 221 MB | UL | TB

Roger Dean Young & The Tin Cup – Casa (2006)

ROPrairie-raised, Vancouver-based songsmith Young has attracted far more attention in the UK than here. In fact, this, his third album, was released there back in the spring, and notched four-star reviews in Uncut and MOJO. That response is not too surprising, given that his brand of atmospheric melancholia fits easily alongside such faves of the Brits as Giant Sand and Jim White, with his voice occasionally sounding akin to Stuart Staples (Tindersticks). Unlike the earthy approach of prairie peer Corb Lund, Young is distinctly cerebral. It sounds like he spent more time reading existentialist philosophy and watching Wim Wenders movies than herding cattle. On first listen, Young’s dry and parched voice sounds a mite affected, but you’re soon drawn into his evocative soundscapes. Some vocal variety is provided by the lovely harmony singing of Samantha Parton (Be Good Tanyas) on such tracks as “Little Wind” and “Wanderlust,” while his backing band, the Tin Cup, acquit themselves well. Proceedings are occasionally too funereal (a couple of songs clock in at six minutes), but there’s no doubting Young’s lyrical skills.

mp3 VBR~173 kbps | 66 MB | UL | CL

Matt Nathanson – Beneath These Fireworks (2003)

51Wn75GU9LLBeneath These Fireworks is singer-songwriter Matt Nathanson’s sixth album in ten years. Born in Massachusetts and based in San Francisco, Nathanson has built a loyal and impassioned grassroots following over the last few years.
Comparisons to John Mayer, Howie Day and Jason Mraz notwithstanding, Nathanson has his own completely unique musical identity that includes a live show that literally has him taking unsuspecting audiences by storm. He knows how to entertain, and his performances take his recorded songs to a completely intense level.

mp3 160 kbps | 49 MB | UL | CL

The Moondoggies – Adiós I’m A Ghost (2013)

MOONThe Moondoggies are among the latest bands to crop up from Seattle’s fertile, folk-inspired flowerbed, rubbing shoulders with the likes of Band of Horses and Blitzen Trapper. Adios, I’m a Ghost, the Everett, WA, quartet’s third full-length record and first for Sub Pop, covers a broad cross section of the ’60s folk, psychedelia, and ambient alt-country sounds that have come to redefine the region. After opening with a brief spell of woodsy fingerpicking, the band gets right into it on “Red Eye”, which turns the record’s soft opening on its ear with a full-bodied chunk of twangy rock and roll. From there, “Pride” revels in the haunting, backwoods folk of Fleet Foxes, “Start Me Over” channels Band of Horses’ big, pastoral power pop, and the echoed, ’70s groove of “A Lot To Give” screams My Morning Jacket.

mp3 320 kbps | 128 MB | UL | CL

Todd Wolfe Band – Miles to Go (2013)

TOGuitar maestro Todd Wolfe and the Todd Wolfe Band release their new album, “Miles To Go” (American Showplace Music), representing another music milestone in Todd’s storied career. The album’s ten tracks run the gamut from straight blues to post-classic rock, each featuring Wolfe’s uniquely rockin’ soulful vocals. Guest performers on Miles To Go (Wolfe’s fifth studio album, eighth total) include noteworthy blues harpist Steve Guyger and organ ace, John Ginty. The Todd Wolfe Band features Justine Gardner (bass, backing vocals); Roger Voss (drums, backing vocals); and Todd Wolfe (vocals, guitars). Yes, they’re a trio. And we’re pretty sure if you look in the dictionary under the word “tight,” you’ll see a photo of this band!  Wolfe – formerly the guitarist in rock singer Sheryl Crow’s band for a five-year period – has truly arrived on his own terms, and as Miles To Go proves, creating quality music for the world to hear.

mp3 192 kbps | 77 MB | UL | CL

Chris Shiflett & The Dead Peasants – All Hat, No Cattle (2013)

CHThe first thing that will surprise you is that Chris Shiflett is the lead guitar player of the Foo Fighters.  The second thing that will surprise you is that this Country Rock outfit is a hell of a band, and this is no one and done side project for an artist that is known for walking on the harder side of the rock spectrum.
All Hat, No Cattle, is a brilliant, exacting tribute to The Bakersfield Sound, and a spot on homage to artists like Buck Owens, Dwight Yoakam, and even Merle Haggard. There is a slightly alternative Dave Alvin vibe to the record, that gives the album a more fresh and up to date sound, and it sounds like there was a hell of a good time in the recording studio, and the live shows for this band are most probably off the chain.

mp3 160 kbps | 40 MB | UL | CL

Little Hurricane – A Collection of Cover Songs (2013)

LITracks:

01 – Dark End of the Street (Percy Sledge)
02 – Bad Moon Rising (CCR )
03 – I’m On Fire (Bruce Springsteen)
04 – Money (Pink Floyd )
05 – Ain’t No Sunshine (Bill Withers)
06 – Shadow Boxer (Fiona Apple)
07 – Grounds for Divorce (Elbo)
08 – Blue Jean Blues (ZZ Top)
09 – Natural Blues (Moby Vera Hall)
10 – Don’t Wanna Miss A Thing (Aerosmith)

mp3 320 kbps | 88 MB | UL | CL

North Mississippi AllStars – World Boogie Is Coming (2013)

northThe seventh studio album from the Americana music luminaries. They produced it themselves at their own Zebra Ranch Studios in Coldwater, MS, aside from a day in the studio with Robert Plant (and his harmonica) at Memphis’ legendary Royal Studios. The Dickinson Brothers did it with the help of long-time friends, Lightnin’ Malcolm, Duwayne and Garry Burnside, Kenny Brown, Alvin Youngblood Hart, Sharde Thomas, Chris Chew, Sid and Steve Selvidge, Plant and others. World Boogie Is Coming is the record that perfectly ties it all together, fusing the elements that have made the Allstars special while pushing the band’s sound further into the future than ever before.

mp3 VBR~237 kbps | 107 MB | UL | CL

Delta Maid – Outside Looking In (2011)

DEFollowing supporting slots with Ray Lamontagne, Ellie Goulding and Martha Wainwright, the Scouse country/blues woman Delta Maid releases her debut album.
Influenced by Patsy Cline, Loretta Lynn and of course numerous Liverpudlian musical greats, Delta makes no attempt to hide her influences over the course of the album, but spins them in a contemporary and fresh way.The 26-year-old croons over her unique and mellifluous acoustic finger picking style and shockingly in the recent musical landscape, writes her own lyrics.

mp3 320 kbps | 110 MB | UL | CL

Black Joe Lewis – Electric Slave (2013)

blThe blues rock revival has seen two distinct halves follow their own paths. On one side, Jack White and The Black Keys moved steadily into the pop realm, their garage-riffed jams largely driven by simple guitar/drums instrumentation and digestible, genre-focused styles (give or take White’s marimba). Those that drift further into the roughed up psych-soul half of the equation have remained one odd step off of that path, the likes of King Khan too gleefully weird and perpetually near-nude, The Black Lips too ready to vomit and piss onstage, Nobunny too…Nobunny. For years now, Black Joe Lewis has been able to straddle the two, his soulful croon, incorporation of richly appointed backing band, and varied discography suggestive of the latter half, yet still approachable enough to suggest a possible move to the big time.
That trend continues on the Austinite’s new LP, Electric Slave. Lewis pushes some individual twists to the agenda without the choices becoming overwhelming. The album professes a strong anti-technology bent, and opener “Skulldiggin” sets that table with gigantic guitar and bone-breaking drum work. In heavier hands Lewis’ howled lyrics about mind control could come off as luddite paranoia, but the chainsaw riffs keep the song from slipping into unbridled mania. Rather than encouraging a Google Hangout, he’s the kind of guy that wants everybody to come over and spend time in person. “I got all the good jams/ gonna pull the furniture out the living room tonight/ cause everybody rockin’ at my party,” he yowls as he sets up a party for just about everyone. This isn’t just for the garage kids or the funk throwbacks; the rhythms are flecked with shimmery disco cymbals and the sax even breaks into a pretty good impression of “Rumpshaker”.

m4a  256 kbps | 89 MB | UL | CL

The Mads – Molesto (2013)

lo The Mads started out in the mid-1960s, playing covers and a few of their own songs on Peruvian television. But a chance sea-side encounter with Mick Jagger and Keith Richards after a private party got the Mads the chance to go to England; interest from Stones’ manager Marshall Chess got them backstage to see Hendrix at the Isle of Wight—and recording time in the Rolling Stones studio.
Some demos recorded there and at Jagger’s Stargroves castle (recorded live to studio truck, just like Led Zeppelin did for their third and fourth albums) plus a name change to MOLESTO got them gigs at the main venues in London. They jammed with Steve Winwood and Brian Davison (The Nice); they played with Jeff Beck and Carmine Appice; Molesto’s guitar player, Alex Ventura, worked in a clothing boutique alongside Freddie Mercury and Roger Taylor. They were in the musical heart of England. And at that point, faced with growing friction within the group, Molesto disbanded. This disc collects recordings from all three stages of Los Mads/The Mads/Molesto’s six year career, including two tracks from the Stargroves session.

mp3 320 kbps | 129 MB | UL | CL

VA – Masters Of The Banjo (1994)

MACollecting live performances from the Masters of the Banjo tour from the early 1990s, an impressive audio history of the banjo is provided by way of 26 performances by 11 different artists. Everything from Seleshe Damessae’s performances on African krar, an ancient precursor to the modern banjo, to Ralph Stanley’s bluegrass workouts is represented, with a large number of the samples coming from a Celtic tradition, as well. Kirk Sutphin, from the legendary Sutphin family, provides fine examples of early American banjo tradition, using claw hammer style in “John Brown’s Dream” and a rollicking string band tune in “Let Me Fall.” Multi-talented Tony Ellis contributes four of his amazingly intricate original compositions, representing the progression of the instrument from primarily being dance accompaniment to something altogether more pensive. Irish tenor banjo workouts by Seamus Egan show a strong influence of Irish uilleann pipes, as he embraces both traditional and contemporary styles. Carroll Best’s unique three-finger style and Will Keys’ two-finger up-picking style are extraordinary examples of how differently the instrument has developed even from region to region in the southern United States. All in all, you have a concise, though certainly not complete, history of the progression of the banjo that does a fine job showing the past, present, and future of the instrument.

mp3 320 kbps | 188 MB | UL | TB

Neko Case – The Worse Things Get, The Harder I Fight, The Harder I Fight, The More I Love You (2013)

FR

On her last album, Middle Cyclone, Neko Case sung about creatures snuffling, frogs and tornadoes, the beauty of ancient nature and our inner animals. Her Attenborough-inspired artistry won her two Grammy nominations in 2009 as well as thrusting her into the glare of the mainstream. So will the singer’s sixth album continue the wave of acclaim, given that it’s largely about loneliness and death? The Worse Things Get, the Harder I Fight, the Harder I Fight, the More I Love You charts the internal minefield of childhood, love, and loss by way of power pop, classic rock, folk and Motown. The album emerges from a three-year period Case describes as full of “grief and mourning,” in the wake of the deaths of many close to her.
“I fought hard against the feeling of grief all my life,” she says, “but about three years ago I finally had to give in and mourn the dead. I had to look inward more than I wanted. It was sobering, and I often felt like I was blurring the lines of mental illness. When I stopped fighting it,” she adds, “it took me where I needed to go.”
Whether she’ll ever come back from the blue remains to be seen. But in the meantime, have a listen and let us know what you think.

FLAC  | 246 MB | UL | TB      mp3 320 kbps | 95 MB | UL | CL