Jeffrey Foucault – Blood Brothers (2018)

Posted by Green on June 21, 2018as

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Following the austere electricity of the critically acclaimed 2015 album, Salt As Wolves (“A country plea, a blues reach for facts beyond sound… scary in the bend of the first note” – Greil Marcus), Jeffrey Foucault delivers Blood Brothers, a collection of reveries, interlacing memory with the present tense to examine the indelible connections of love across time and distance. The title track is an aching ballad of lost love, written with drummer Billy Conway and embroidered with the impossibly soft and near-transparent lilt of Iowa’s Pieta Brown. Blood Brothers is out June 22 via Blueblade Records.

New York, NY (April 18, 2018) – Following the austere electricity of the critically acclaimed 2015 album, Salt As Wolves (“A country plea, a blues reach for facts beyond sound… scary in the bend of the first note” – Greil Marcus), Jeffrey Foucault delivers Blood Brothers, a collection of reveries, interlacing memory with the present tense to examine the indelible connections of love across time and distance. The title track is an aching ballad of lost love, written with drummer Billy Conway and embroidered with the impossibly soft and near-transparent lilt of Iowa’s Pieta Brown. Blood Brothers is out June 22 via Blueblade Records.

A departure from the darkness of his last outing, Blood Brothers sets blues aside to pull together strands of country, R&B, gospel, rock’n’roll, and folk in a series of delicate small-canvas portraits. There’s a touch more light coming through the window, a certain gentleness in play, with layers of backing vocals sung by women – including Foucault’s wife Kris Delmhorst, as well as the various partners of the band – adding hue and shade.

Cut live to tape in three days at Pachyderm Studios in rural Minnesota, Blood Brothers reconvenes Salt As Wolves’s all-star ensemble: Foucault’s longtime tour partner Billy Conway (Morphine) on drums, Bo Ramsey (Lucinda Williams) on electric guitars, and Jeremy Moses Curtis (Booker T) on bass, joined this time by pedal steel great Eric Heywood (Pretenders) to unite in the studio both iterations of the band with which Foucault has toured and recorded for over a decade. Charting a vision of American music without cheap imitation or self-conscious irony, the ensemble deploys an instinctive restraint and use of negative space, an economy of phrase and raw simplicity that complement perfectly Foucault’s elegant lines and weather-beaten drawl.

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